A couple of years ago I watched the movie Where’d you go Bernadette? and immediately became obsessed with the idea of going to Antarctica. I later found out that the scenes that are supposed to be in Antarctica were actually filmed in Greenland, but that hasn’t waivered my need to visit Antarctica!

Anyone who knows me is well aware that I am the least outdoorsy person you will ever meet, so I know me wanting to go on thiss trip is going to be a surprise to many.

But look at this…

Iceberg, Lindblad Cove, Antarctica aboard National Geographic Explorer. January 2011

I want to go there and see this…

An explosion of gentoo penguins alongside makes this kayaking experience doubly extraordinary.

Antarctica is one of the world’s last great wildernesses. It is said that a voyage to Antarctica is one of the most exhilarating adventures the planet offers, and one of the most life-enhancing travel decisions any traveler can make.

There are a number of cruise lines that venture down to Antarctica. One that I have my eye on is with National Geographic and Lindblad Expeditions.

Lars-Eric Lindblad, considered by many to be the “father of ecotourism,” founded Lindblad Travel in 1958. In 1966, he brought the first group of “citizen explorers” to Antarctica. Lindblad Expeditions-National Geographic have joined forces to further inspire the world through expedition travel.

Together they are good stewards to the earth and encourage greater awareness and understanding of issues impacting the regions where they travel.

National Geographic Orion, Lemaire Channel, Antarctica

The 148-guest National Geographic Explorer and 126-guest National Geographic Endurance and National Geographic Resolution are purpose-built Antarctic expedition ships designed to safely explore Antarctica—the most remote, wild place on the planet. They are fully stabilized, ice-class vessels with ice-strengthened hulls strong enough to push through the Antarctic ice. Their construction and the caliber of their Icemaster Captains and veteran expedition teams are your assurances of safety.

It’s in the early season (Oct.-Nov.) when the Captain can adroitly “park” National Geographic Explorer, allowing guests to disembark directly on the ice.

Every expedition sails with a veteran expedition leader and a team of eight naturalists, many of them polar veterans, of a variety of specialties: zoology, biology, ornithology, geology, polar history, and more. Other members of the 15-person team include an undersea specialist, a National Geographic photographer, plus a Lindblad-National Geographic certified photo instructor, a video chronicler and a wellness specialist. Together, they provide you with a greater understanding and appreciation for this exceptional place.  

Hikers, Neko Harbor, Antarctica

Who’s ready for this amazing adventure?

My Bucket List

Amawaterways Christmas Market River Cruises

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